How to insert images almost anywhere

In Datawrapper, you can use HTML to insert images to tooltipstablesfootnotes/ titles/ descriptions and in iframes as background image.  

⚠️ Are you seeing a broken image icon?

Image links should be publicly accessible and served over HTTPS (and not HTTP)*. Also, if you use images that you haven't created and are not under an open license, make sure to attribute the photographer/creator.

*Datawrapper visualizations are loaded over a secure HTTPS connection. Some browsers like Chrome blocks mixed content (insecure http:// subresources on https:// pages). To make sure your inserted image is displayed in all browsers, check that your content uses a secure HTTPS connection.

  1. Insert images to tooltips
  2. Insert images in tables
  3. Insert images to footnotes, titles, and descriptions
  4. Insert images in the iframe as background 

Insert images to tooltips

To add images to tooltips, we use the HTML <img> tag. Copy and paste the following code to the tooltip text field: 

<img src="https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Amsterdam_%28NL%29%2C_Anne-Frank-Huis_--_2015_--_7185.jpg" width="100%">

Replace the image address link with the URL for your image. Make sure to keep   <strong>width="100%"</strong>. This will make the image as wide as the tooltip allows. (Otherwise, your image becomes super big; bigger than the tooltip):

If you’ve never seen this before, here’s a short explanation:  <img> is an individual element in HTML. It shouts out to everyone who wants to hear it (e.g. your browser) that we want to use an image. In  this   <img>  element  , we define two things: The source of the image –src– and the width of the image –width

The source has to be an address. This could be an address of vacation pics on your computer. But then only you can see  them s ince only you can access the images on your computer. That’s not terribly convenient. So when creating a tooltip, link to an image that exists on the web. For example, you can use the image search machine pxhere since all of their images are under a license that doesn’t require you to attribute the photographer. Or you could upload your images to a service like imgur.com and then link from there. 

To get the url of the image, right click on the image and select " Copy Image Address" from the menu:

Insert images in tables

To add images in Datawrapper tables, you can't use img tags. Instead, you can use markdown to do the same thing: 

![](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Amsterdam_%28NL%29%2C_Anne-Frank-Huis_--_2015_--_7185.jpg)

Note: Make sure that your URL starts with HTTPS and not HTTP and is publicly accessible. 

Changing the image size

Markdown doesn't allow you to set a specific size, so to increase the size of the image, increase the font-size of the column from Step 3: Visualize: 

Or, you could also wrap it in an HTML tag <span> and give it some style: 

<span style="font-size:50px;">![](https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cb/Amsterdam_%28NL%29%2C_Anne-Frank-Huis_--_2015_--_7185.jpg)</span>

Insert images to footnotes, titles, and descriptions

To insert images e.g. in the footnotes we can't directly use the <img> tag. Instead, we use the <b> tag and give it a background image: 

<b style="float:left; margin: 5px; width: 50px; height: 30px; background: url(https://media.giphy.com/media/sIIhZliB2McAo/giphy.gif); background-size: 50px 30px;"></b>

Insert images in the iframe as background 

There are a few things you can do to customize your iframe. 

For example, you can change the background color of the visualization by adding a background-color to the style attribute in the embed code. 

background-color: yellow;

You can even set a custom background to the visualization by adding an image url in the iframe code:

background-image: url('https://your-image-address.com');

like so:

<iframe title="Share of individuals using the internet, 2015" aria-label="Map" id="datawrapper-chart-TNscZ" src="https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/TNscZ/4/" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" style="width: 0; min-width: 100% !important; border: none; background-image: url('https://images.unsplash.com/photo-1563291074-2bf8677ac0e5?ixlib=rb-1.2.1&ixid=eyJhcHBfaWQiOjEyMDd9&auto=format&fit=crop&w=702&q=80');" height="510"></iframe>

image credit: Annie Spratt